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Overview
This condition has been observed in multiple family members and has propensity to occur slightly more in females than males. For most individuals this condition is a non-issue and most people who have them never have a problem with them. Over the years when x-raying patients for other problems I will point out that they have an extra bone in their foot and the usual response from the patient is nothing more than a yawn.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
Accessory navicular syndrome as it is called can result from a number of causes, excess or overuse syndrome as seen in an athlete. Trauma to the foot as in an ankle sprain or direct trauma to the navicular bone. chronic irritation from shoes rubbing against the extra bone, over time, may cause pain. Excessive pronation which strains the attachment of tibialis posterior muscles into the navicular bone. Keep in mind, the larger the actual accessory bone, the greater the chance of it becoming an issue.

Symptoms
Symptoms of this syndrome would include redness, swelling and tenderness over the navicular bone. The navicular bone is located on the inside of the foot approximately midway between the ankle bone and big toe joint. It will tend to be worse after activity and can be aggravated by those that wear very dressy shoes as opposed to casual shoes like sneakers. In other words, the flatter or less supportive the shoe, the greater the chance for pain.

Diagnosis
Your podiatrist will most likely diagnose accessory navicular syndrome by making a visual study of the area, checking whether the shape of your foot and your ability to move it indicate there?s an accessory navicular lurking around. He or she may push on the prominence on your foot to check to see if it hurts, and may ask you to walk around in order to ascertain how your gait is affected. In order to get a certain diagnosis, your podiatrist will need some way to see the inside of your foot, which will most likely involve getting X-rays, or possibly an MRI or some other scan of your foot?s interior.

Non Surgical Treatment
Most doctors will try to find a non-surgical approach to the issue due to costs and complications involved in a surgery. Some non-surgical procedures are: Immobilization which consists of placing the foot in a cast or walking boot to allow rest and decrease inflammation, placing a towel-covered-icepack on the area to reduce inflammation, anti-inflammatory or steroid drugs/injections may be prescribed to reduce swelling and pain, physical therapy may be used to help strengthen muscles and prevent a reoccurrence of symptoms, Orthotic Devices placed in the shoe to help support the arch and prevent a reoccurrence of symptoms.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
If all nonsurgical measures fail and the fragment continues to be painful, surgery may be recommended. The most common procedure used to treat the symptomatic accessory navicular is the Kidner procedure. A small incision is made in the instep of the foot over the accessory navicular. The accessory navicular is then detached from the posterior tibial tendon and removed from the foot. The posterior tibial tendon is reattached to the remaining normal navicular. Following the procedure, the skin incision is closed with stitches, and a bulky bandage and splint are applied to the foot and ankle. You may need to use crutches for several days after surgery. Your stitches will be removed in 10 to 14 days (unless they are the absorbable type, which will not need to be taken out). What do you do for Achilles tendonitis? should be safe to be released to full activity in about six weeks.

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تاريخ : شنبه 21 مرداد 1396 | 17:19 | نویسنده : Corey Skeens |